Postcard from Toulouse, France: Flavors with a different accent

Above: Vegetarian version of the generous planches found at Prosciutteria

When traveling and eating out every day, sometimes you crave breaking out of the regional mode. A wild abundance of vegetables was our goal when we ducked into Prosciutteria on Rue des Filatiers. We found ourselves well-rewarded with a vegetarian appetizer board, so abundant we shared and ordered nothing else. Well, aside from wine. Subsequently, we found their salads and bruschetone equally as fresh and good.

Rue des Filatiers was our neighborhood, so we tried several other casual spots there as well, all with fine street-side people-watching opportunities. We found ourselves grabbing amply filled empanadas to-go for cocktail-hour snacks from El Almacen – Empanadas. Miss Fish appeared to be brand new, or only recently reopened, and boasted a nice variety of seafood. It seems a place that should prove particularly popular with British travelers missing their fish and chips.

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Postcard from Bologna, Italy: We did eat at more than one restaurant

Rightfully, Bologna is renowned for its food. And, although this postcard is a bit belated, I’d hate to leave one with the impression our only recommendation for those traveling there is E’ Cucina Leopardi. We truly did venture away from our favorite spot… sometimes.

The lack of pretension accompanied by a comfortable, casual hospitality made the small farm-to-table Osteria Marsalino a favorite. Bruschetta and daily pastas were ever-changing based on what was fresh and the chef’s mood. Our food always was perfect, and the complimentary aperitif at the end of the meal contributed to our loyalty.

Fresh organic products are stressed at the always bustling Alce Nero Berbere. One lunchtime option is to order the daily vegetable assortment, consisting of five or six separate small plates of varying salads, greens, beans and/or roasted seasonal fare. There is a movement afoot among chefs in Italy, which we first encountered at Borgo 20 in Parma, to fret about digesting pizza dough. Although we never have noticed this to be a problem, we certainly again enjoyed the results at Berbere.

This is Berbere’s complex explanation of what makes the restaurant’s pizzas so “light” and good:

One of the principal characteristics of Berberè pizza is the substitution of leavening with natural maturation: we don’t use chemical yeast, but rather living sourdough. This maturation process lasts at least 24 hours at room temperature and not in the refrigerator (hence it is “slow” pizza). Thanks to the skill of our pizzaioli and their passion for what they do, the quality of the base dough obtained with the starter and semi-whole grain stone-ground flours guarantees a high digestibility and a distinctive flavor, while the selection and mixture of flours other than wheat (spelt, enkir, kamut) offers alternatives that are interesting and diverse from an organoleptic point of view. Berberè’s pizza is therefore lighter, healthier, and better. And to optimize the digestibility of the pizza, the chefs at Berberè have successfully experimented with an innovative fermentation method, completely free of yeast, based on the physical process of starch hydrolysis.

We followed a herd of locals to get the prosciutto in which residents of Emilia-Romagna take such pride. After ordering an appetizer plate laden with the thinly sliced ham, we ordered what we thought was a plate of grilled vegetables at Pane Vino e San Daniele. What we didn’t realize is that bountiful servings of prosciutto cover everything on almost every dish, including the vegetables.

Of course, we enjoyed many pizzas, grilled vegetables, pastas, risottos and panini elsewhere in our wanderings throughout our month-long stay. But, not to offend the Bolognese, we did break away from the regional cuisine several times. For Indian food. Ristorante Indiano Taj Mahal rewarded us well for it. The Indian dishes were much better than what we have encountered in San Antonio and, as a bonus, represented an incredible bargain. And the owner was so friendly and gracious for our patronage.

Jumping back now to our task at hand, figuring out where we want to eat lunch in Campeche. A whole different world.