Postcard from Valencia, Spain: Stifling the voice of women leads to startling image on street

So wish this powerful image from Valencia was plastered up prominently near the Capitol in Austin to haunt legislators upon entering.

Among the most humorous in this final posting of Valencian street art is the juxtaposition of “Chihuahua Man” above a small children’s playground. And love the dotted cart parked by the artist giving his leopard a final dose of spots.

Of course, the Mister’s favorite is what we referred to as “Our Lady of the Tube Amps.”

Postcard from Valencia, Spain: Clouds of incense fill Church of the Patriarch

Swirling clouds of incense blurred the ceiling frescoes and dome of the Church of the Patriarch when we finally managed to coordinate our arrival as a mass ended. The church is associated with a seminary still active, and the monks residing there are known for their daily Gregorian chants, which we missed.

The church and cloisters were founded by San Juan de Ribera in the XVI century. Juan de Ribera was born in Seville in 1532 and educated in Salamanca. He became archbishop of Valencia, leading to his establishment of the Royal Seminary.

Today a large portion of the cloisters is filled with a rich collection of art, including work by Valencian-born Renaissance painter, Juan de Juanes  (1523-1579) (love that name).

One of my favorite things about the church and chapel is the juxtaposition of cheerful bright tilework with the serious religious frescoes, accented by a sprinkling of chubby cherubs. And, of course, Saint Anthony, the patron saint of our hometown, seems to follow us everywhere we travel.

Postcard from Valencia, Spain: Street art key ingredient spicing up cityscape

Bare walls assume the role of an admission-free museum with constantly changing exhibits in Valencia. Here’s another sprinkling of the street art we encountered as our walks crisscrossed the city.

Batman’s multiple appearances are not merely due to the release of yet another sequel. The superhero is popular as the bat is a symbol of the city dating from the period it was governed by the Crown of Aragon.

And, as I tended to snap away given the wealth of street art in Valencia, expect a sequel to this installment in the near future.