Postcard from Cadiz, Spain: Jueves Santo processions stretch toward dawn

As Saint John (I think?) headed down the street, we were returning to our apartment about 7:30 last night. During our meandering hour or two walk we encountered this float bearing the evangelist, Mary the wife of Cleopus, Mary Magdalene, the Virgin Mary and Jesus with the cross a multitude of times.

Their swaying journey on the golden paso was not close to over for the night. Perhaps they were still Cathedral-bound because costaleros in purple t-shirts slipped into the procession to replace the team underneath porting the heavy load within the next block. The back of this float has a small emblem of Hercules on it, which seems appropriate when you watch a team hoist it back up after lowering it.

The Mister spotted the putto with a nail-puller, perhaps indicative of the historical trade engaged in by some members of the velvet capirote-ed cofradia sponsoring the procession. (I have noticed the role of hard-working putti in the church often is overlooked. Yes, sometimes they appear fluttering around in fluffy clouds, but more often petite putti spend eternity supporting enormous statues, altars, organs, columns and even soaring domes.)

I am unsure how many processions were weaving their way around our neighborhood last night, but they do march for hours. Floats pass through the Cathedral, but do not encamp overnight. They must make the return trip to their home churches and squeeze back through the doors.

Our street might not quite be a paso-possible width, but processions were crossing at both ends less than a block away in addition to a square a block away. This crossroads location meant the procession-watchers on foot would come down our little rarely trafficked street in large, chattering groups before and after each passing.

They awakened me in time to hear the brass bands and thudding drums about 12:30 and 2:30. The 4:30 crowd sounded much smaller. At 6:30 this morning it seemed a second more refreshed and sedate shift of faithful followers was filtering out to view the final float trying to reach home before dawn.

How will they all recover in time to participate in Viernes Santo?

Postcard from Sevilla, Spain: The patron saint of nerds doesn’t stand a chance against the mighty tile Mary

The patron saint of Sevilla is San Isidro, Saint Isidore of Seville (560-636), Archbishop of Sevilla. I failed to find what miracles were credited to him to attain sainthood, and I think he died a natural death. His major accomplishment was his encyclopedic Etymologiae, collecting and preserving numerous early written works of antiquity.

But, wandering the streets of Sevilla, it is obvious La Virgen reigns. She lords over everything everywhere. Upon arriving, I decided to snap a photo of every tile mural of her I encountered.

It quickly became apparent that was absurd. Although the Mister is patient, we would have to stop at almost every corner to accomplish that. Plus, how many photos are allowed in one blog post?

But today might be the time for San Isidro’s popularity to soar. Au courant, he is the patron saint of the Internet, computers and nerds.

From now on, I will try to utter San Isidro’s name when I encounter computer frustration instead of my usual over-employed four-letter words.

The poor saint does not stand much of a chance in Sevilla though. Internet powers pale next to the beauty of the abundant tile tributes to the Virgin Mary found along her streets.

Many more azulejo postcards, not all La Virgen, will be posted in the coming weeks….

Postcard from Cadiz, Spain: Palm Sunday floats sway through the streets

His reputation preceded him. When Jesus rode into Jerusalem astride a donkey, his miraculous raising of Lazarus from the dead was fresh in the minds of many. They swarmed into the streets to greet Hosanna, paving his way with palms and even their cloaks.

Jesus’ progress probably was faster then than when he was waiting. Waiting. Waiting outside the door of the Cathedral in Cadiz for yet one more procession to commence.

A lot of waiting is involved for all participating in the processions commemorating Domingo de Ramos, or Palm Sunday. The dirges are slow-paced. And the costaleros porting the heavy floats on the back of their necks need breaks, as their duty lasts for hours and hours.

Upon re-levitatating the pasos following the brief “restful” squats, the team of about 40 porters are greeted with applause by the faithful lining the streets. Hoisting these ornate beauties is a major feat, as some weigh in at more than 4,000 pounds. It was not surprising to witness a mother peeking under a skirt of a float at rest to check on the health of her son.

The capirotes, tall caps funneling messages to the heavens, worn by the nazarenos appear a bit uncomfortable for the participants struggling to keep the holes aligned with their eyes. Some of the penitents bare their feet to help them identify with the suffering Jesus endured during the week following his initial triumphal entry into Jerusalem.

The videos are not action-packed but will give you a feel for the swaying motion of the men carrying the pasos and the accompanying music. A large percentage of the population in Cadiz must grow up playing horns.

The processions from various churches to and from the Cathedral last most of the day. Drums still echoed down the street hours after sundown.