Postcard from Mexico City: A street art sampler

Our headquarters during our stay was in Roma Norte, but we wandered afoot a far piece from there. These snapshots of street art were gathered during those ramblings.

My grandmother, Thelma Virginia Tarrall Williams (1899-1999), did not believe in keeping her hands idle. She lived a long, long time so had plenty of time to crochet. Afghans. Afghans for her children, her grandchildren and even some of her great-grandchildren before retiring her needles. Aside from one that burned in our house in 1975, most of the coverlets probably still exist, cherished as family heirlooms.

Whenever I see a contemporary take on knitting or crocheting, such as the one cloaking the tree trunk above, I think what fun Grana would have had liberating her craft from the confines of domesticity into public spaces. I can almost hear her chuckling with pleasure over transforming a tree for all to see.

The serendipitous pleasure of encountering street art lies in the exuberant freedom of expression of its creators.

Postcard from Oaxaca, Mexico: Always high season for calaveras

So many calaveras pop up in Oaxaca, one would think these photos represent newcomers to the street scene added to herald the approach of Day of the Dead.

But I must confess, the timeliness is coincidental. These “postcards” of street art date from mid-August.

Calaveras and catrinas never are out of season in Oaxaca.

 

Postcard from Budapest, Hungary: Brightening up bare walls

Blank walls in the area of Budapest known for ruin pubs make seductively tall canvases for street artists. A façade rehabilitation project enlisted Neopaint Works to transform a number of buildings in the neighborhood. Several of our encounters with street art in Budapest are the result of this project. Not sure of the origin of the life-size cut-outs on the balcony above.