An Ostrich-Plumed Hat: Chapter Ninety-Five

Andrew Stevens, March 1918

“The anti-German sentiment is so strong,” grumbles the Colonel, “the Loyalty Laws have taken away the older generation’s right to talk on the street. In Fredericksburg, Boerne, New Braunfels, most of the Texas Hill Country, if men are prohibited from expressing themselves in German, they have no vocabulary at their command. As you know, Andy, many of the inhabitants never have learned a word of English.”

“The last time I walked down Main Street in Boerne, Colonel, German was all I heard.”

“And the Anti-Saloon League, constantly pumping out propaganda that the breweries are all part of an enormous German conspiracy to take over the United States. I felt I had no choice but to make this commitment on the floor of the Texas House of Representatives yesterday: ‘The breweries of Texas stand ready to close as a patriotic measure, when, in the opinion of the President of the nation, such a course is desired for winning the war.’ It generated much applause, but I certainly am glad Otto was not alive to hear it.”

Continue reading “An Ostrich-Plumed Hat: Chapter Ninety-Five”

An Ostrich-Plumed Hat: Chapter Ninety-Three

an ostrich-plumed hat

Begin with Chapter One ~ Return to Chapter Ninety-Two

Former Governor Thomas Mitchell Campbell, January 1918

“Missus Ramer, at last,” begins District Attorney McAskill. “Please tell us why Miss Burgemeister came to see you in October of 1914.”

“Miss Burgemeister met me in the Gibbs Building, at my office, because she desired to add a codicil to her will.”

“How did Miss Burgemeister behave when she signed the instrument you prepared?” continues the District Attorney.

“She shielded the document to conceal her name from the witnesses.”

Continue reading “An Ostrich-Plumed Hat: Chapter Ninety-Three”

An Ostrich-Plumed Hat: Chapter Eighty-Nine

Above, Proceedings of Investigation Committee, House of Representatives Thirty-Fifth Legislature: Charges Against Governor James E. Ferguson, Texas History Collection, Austin History Center via Portal to Texas History

an ostrich-plumed hat

Begin with Chapter One ~ Return to Chapter Eighty-Eight

Former Governor Thomas Mitchell Campbell, September 1917

“Farmer Jim declines to name his friends, as he calls his wealthy saviors who leapt forward to lend him more than $150,000 to bail him out of debt in the nick of time to rescue his pig farm. He says the people have no right to know details of his private business affairs. Hogwash.”

Fannie sniffs. “It smells as malodorous as that offensive pig farm down the road.”

“We doubt he was acquainted with any of these friends before he ran for governor. Upon repeated questioning by several senators, the closest thing to an answer he has given is: ‘It is perfectly simple if you knew all the facts, but I cannot tell you the facts.’ And he can’t tell them because he promised his friends he wouldn’t reveal their names.”

“I should think, Thomas, these so-called friends wouldn’t care if their names were made public if this transaction was above board.”

Continue reading “An Ostrich-Plumed Hat: Chapter Eighty-Nine”