Postcard from Guanajuato, Mexico: While we spent a year home cooking, chefs did not lose their touch

Above: Tartar de atun en chile viejo at Mestizo

Memories of a great classic margarita and appetizers from the sea drew us back to one of our standbys in Guanajuato – Mestizo. The presentation of tender tuna tartare, crowned by an ancho chile overflowing with more, is stunning. Octopus carpaccio arrives in a bath of the fruit of the nopal and dried chiles, and tostadas topped with shredded duck salpicon were satisfying. Both salmon and bass are cooked to perfection, and even pedestrian-sounding soups provided surprisingly savory, less filling, options.

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Postcard from Guanajuato, Mexico: From corn fritters to affogato

Kicking this food post off with our favorite way to end a meal in Guanajuato: an affogato from Estacion Gelato. Particularly when cardamom gelato is among the offerings to serve as the base for the pour of espresso.

Most craved dish is the corn and jalapeno fritter appetizer at Los Campos Cantina y Restaurante. In fact, Los Campos proved our all-around favorite restaurant during our fall visit.

We were also taken by the addition of a new sister spot, Metate Tacos – Mezcal – Vino. The best guacamole ever, spicy fried chickpeas, a delightful stuffed guero chile and falling-off-the-bone-tender pork shank for making tacos to share at the table. The owners were tinkering with the menu though, and the last time we tried to go none of those were available. The online menu appears as though the chef settled on keeping most of the dishes we loved. If you go, let us know.

Enjoyed new menu items at the upscale Mestizo. Pulpo carpaccio was sweet and tender, and the tuna “carnitas” tacos were a nice change.

In the Presa neighborhood, Amatxi appeared particularly popular with chilangos, but we found the laidback front porch of nearby La Victoriana a more suitable fit for us.

While restaurants encircle the intimate, shady and mariachi-filled Jardin de la Union, we have always shunned eating there. Kind of more of a beer-sipping people-watching spot. We decided to end our snobbery and try the always-bustling Casa Valadez. We found nothing wrong with the food and extremely professional service; all fine if you want to pay higher prices than needed and be assured of eating with all tourists.

We countered that by going into the hole-in-the-wall seafood spot tucked away behind Iglesia de San Diego – La Vela Marisqueria. As tiny and casual as a shack on the beach, La Vela has great fresh ceviche and tacos.

And El Santurrona Gastropub is a perfect spot for people-watching away from the jardin. The fried chicken sandwich is not a bad choice at all.

And then, for a total change in flavor, the fresh food at Delica Mitsu, Campenero location, is great, and you find yourself surrounded by a sea of young Asian college students who agree.

We also enjoy the funky Escarola with its fresh falafel burger. But we must confess that part of its appeal is its convenient location near our favorite after-lunch spot – Estacion de Gelato.

Postcard from Mexico City: Rivera freed stories from ancient stones

After vanquishing the Aztecs in Mexico City, Hernan Cortes (1485-1547) requisitioned the stones from the destroyed palace of Moctezuma II (1466-1520) to build his home on the same site across the plaza from the Cathedral. While much of this building was devastated in 1692, the stones were incorporated yet again as the building blocks for what is known as the National Palace, the current home of Mexico’s Treasury and Archives departments.

Working on an immense mural on a massive staircase within the governmental building between 1929 and 1935, Diego Rivera (1886-1957) released some of the stories witnessed by those stones. Tackling centuries of the history of Mexico in one composition, he viewed his painting as an opportunity to redefine the national identity. An accompanying set of murals, added between 1940 and 1951 and covering part of the walls on the second floor, traced pre-Hispanic history and the early roots of products of Mexico.

Instead of presenting history through the traditional European descendant lens, an anti-Indian and anti-Mestizo lens, Rivera glorified what it meant to be Mexican. He did not shrink away from presenting the brutal horror of the conquest or the corruption he saw within the clergy or the reign of Porfirio Diaz (1830-1915). Native Americans and those of mixed race were given dignity as the true faces of Mexico.

Diego Rivera belonged to a generation of Mexican muralists who picked up paintbrushes as others would swords. His paintbrush was wielded as a powerful didactic tool for shaping public opinion and affecting political change.