Postcard from Cadiz, Spain: Final Semana Santa processions pass through her streets

From early afternoon to the wee hours of the morning, the winding streets of Cadiz have been entangled with crisscrossing Semana Santa processions.

Banners and the color of robes worn by members of the different cofradias distinguish the sponsoring group for each procession. Most have only two actual floats, but the marching continues for hours as they transport their particular Virgin Mary and portion of the tale of Jesus’ trials and tribulations from plaza to plaza.

The mood of the spectators is mainly reverential, although the end of each procession is followed by the vendors’ carts offering candies, including caramel lollipops in the shape of the pointed capirotes.

The most excitement is generated by watching the teams of costaleros struggle to squeeze the floats in and out of the church doors with barely an inch to spare in any direction. And the music. The brass bands are filled with more talented musicians than it seems possible for a city of the size of Cadiz to possess.

And finally, the processions conclude with the resurrected figure of Jesus standing unburdened atop his Easter Sunday paso.

Not a bunny in sight.

Postcards from Oaxaca, Mexico: Musical sounds all around

Music is everywhere in Oaxaca. Street performers park on the sidewalk, and wandering soloists and groups play for tips in the Zocalo. (If only they were forbidden from playing “My Way” ever again, particularly on the marimba….)

Dancers and brass bands booked for wedding celebrations are the norm every Saturday in front of Templo Santo Domingo and parading through the streets. Traditional jarocho bands perform regularly at Venadito Espacio Cultural.

An unusal addition to the sounds surrounding us this year was a musician who would show up most days at our extended breakfast time to practice classical pieces on the piano adjacent to our living area.

That, and the opportunity to hear a concert featuring Paul Cohen’s jazz group with an appearance by Lila Downs.

Leaving you with some snippets from celebrations in front of Santo Domingo.

2018 Roundup: Remember Alamo Plaza

Every six months this blogger reviews what posts people have been reading most during the past year.

San Antonians’ Alamoobsessiveness was ignited by the state’s determination to fence in a designated city park – Alamo Plaza. Related posts dominate this year-end list. A battle lost. Time to move on as the plaza’s fate appears sealed. Hopefully the New Year will bring glad tidings about preserving historic landmarks on the west side of the plaza.

On a more upbeat note, cannot wait for the completion of Margarita Cabrera’s “Arbol de la Vida: Voces de Tierra” on the river near Mission San Francisco de la Espada.

The following list represents the posts you clicked on most, with the numbers in parentheses representing rankings from six months ago:

  1. Alamo CEO applying armtwisting pressure to secure gated plaza, 2018
  2. Forging consensus for the Alamo Comprehensive Plan: Don’t fence us out, 2018 (2)
  3. ‘Tree of Life’ bears bountiful crop of tales from the past, 2018 (4)
  4. King William Home Tour: Historic houses whisper stories of early residents, 2018

    523 King William Street, riverside

  5. The Madarasz murder mystery: Might Helen haunt Brackenridge Park?, 2012 (1)
  6. Please put this song on Tony’s pony, and make it ride away, 2010 (5)
  7. Street art entices venturing under the overpass, 2018 
  8. Marilyn Lanfear buttons up a collection of family stories, 2018
  9. Centenarian Santa still burning bright, 2018 
  10. Postcard from Rome, Italy: A numbers game sparked by the baths, 2018
  11. Postcard from Mexico City: Shimmering with colorful experiences, 2018
  12. Postcard from Genoa, Italy: Hey, don’t knock the peanuts, 2018

Thanks for visiting and your patience with my wanderings via this blog.

Would love to hear from you, so please feel free to “chat back” some. Every post has a comment box at the bottom.

All tuckered out now. Thinking I might need a post-eve-celebration nap.

Monumental Cemetery of Staglieno, Genoa, Italy

And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere! (my trusty friend)
and gie’s a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll tak’ a right gude-willie waught, (good-will draught)
for auld lang syne.

For auld lang syne, my jo,
for auld lang syne,
we’ll tak’ a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

“Auld Lang Syne,” Robert Burns, 1788